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Research papers about colostrum

Here, we present a list of scientific papers published in peer-reviewed journals that describe research based on or related to studies using bovine colostrum provided by us.


2016

Spray dried, pasteurized bovine colostrum protects against gut dysfunction and inflammation in preterm pigs
Feeding bovine colostrum instead of infant formula to newborn preterm pigs improves their gut maturation and function and protects against necrotizing enterocolitis. Using preterm pigs as animal model to preterm infants, bovine colostrum makes a good nutrient supply when mother’s milk is insufficient. Before use on preterm infant, it is important to know if the milk processing affects the bioactivity and the efficacy of a bovine colostrum product. This was studied by feeding infant formula or raw, spray-dried or pasteurized bovine colostrum to preterm piglets. All preterm pigs fed bovine colostrum had reduced necrotizing enterocolitis severity relative to preterm pigs fed infant formula. Spray drying and pasteurization showed some effect on bovine colostrum proteins, but did not reduce the trophic and anti-inflammatory effects of bovine colostrum on the immature intestine.

Bovine colostrum improves neonatal growth, digestive function, and gut immunity relative to donor human milk and infant formula in preterm piglets
Mother’s milk is the optimal first diet for infants, but donor human milk or infant formula is used when supply is limited. Preterm pigs fed with colostrum show higher body growth, intestinal transit time and reduced diarrhea and gut permeability, relative to pigs fed with donor human milk or infant formula. They also show a more developed and mature colon. Pigs fed on donor human milk showed intermediate values, while pigs fed on infant formula showed the lowest values. Also, >50% of pigs fed on infant formula showed severe necrotizing enterocolitis, while only subclinical intestinal lesions were found in pigs fed bovine colostrum or donor human milk. Using preterm piglets as model for preterm infants, bovine colostrum is feasible as diet supplement to preterm infants when supply of mother’s milk is limited.

Doxorubicin-induced gut toxicity in piglets fed bovine milk and colostrum
A common adverse effect of cancer treatment is chemotherapy-induced intestinal toxicity, showing clinical signs as diarrhea and weight loss. Bovine colostrum is rich in immunoglobulins and bioactive proteins and is crucial for the development of the gastrointestinal system and the immune system in calves. In this study, preweaned piglets were given the chemotherapy medication Doxorubicin to induce intestinal toxicity. When fed with bovine colostrum afterwards, piglets had lower diarrhea severity and reduced intestinal toxicity relative to piglets fed on enriched bovine milk. Using preterm pigs as model for preterm infant, the results indicate that bovine colostrum is feasible as supplemental diet for children in chemotherapy, as it could help protect the intestines from chemotherapy-induced toxicity.

Milk diets influence doxorubicin-induced intestinal toxicity in piglets
Chemotherapy-induced intestinal toxicity is a common adverse effect of cancer treatment, showing clinical signs as diarrhea and weight loss. Bovine colostrum is crucial for the development of the gastrointestinal system and immune system in calves. This study tested if the immunomodulatory effects of bovine colostrum could reduce the severity of chemotherapy-induced complications. Preterm piglets were given the chemotherapy medication Doxorubicin, and were fed either infant formula or bovine colostrum. All piglets given Doxorubicin developed diarrhea, growth deficits and leukopenia, but those fed bovine colostrum showed less pronounced intestinal toxicity than those fed infant formula. Using preterm piglet as a model, bovine colostrum to be a beneficial supplementary diet for children in chemotherapy.


2015

Bovine colostrum modulates myeloablative chemotherapy-induced gut toxicity in piglets
Chemotherapy frequently induces intestinal toxicity, resulting in poor treatment outcomes and increased mortality. The severity of such intestinal toxicity may be diet dependent. Bovine colostrum is rich in immunoglobulins and bioactive proteins and is crucial for the development of the gastrointestinal system and the immune system in calves. Intake of bovine colostrum as diet supplement could reduce adverse effects of chemotherapy. This study tested if bovine colostrum provides better gut protection than artificial milk replacer does in preweaned piglets. The piglets received myeloablative treatment and were fed either bovine colostrum or artificial milk replacer. All piglets receiving chemotherapy showed intestinal toxicity, but those fed bovine colostrum showed less vomiting, higher intestinal function and lower tissue inflammation. Using preterm piglets as model for preterm infant, the results indicate that children receiving chemotherapy may benefit from intake of bovine colostrum as diet supplement.

Introducing enteral feeding induces intestinal subclinical inflammation and respective chromatin changes in preterm pigs
Enteral feeding is likely to induce subclinical inflammation in a premature intestine and increase the susceptibility for necrotizing enterocolitis. When tested in preterm pigs as enteral supplement to parental nutrition, infant formula showed higher levels of damage than bovine colostrum, the latter only showing minimal effect. Using preterm pigs as a model for preterm infants, bovine colostrum is feasible as enteral feeding as it minimizes severe adverse effects resulting from enteral feeding.

Early gradual feeding with bovine colostrum improves gut function and NEC resistance to infant formula in preterm pigs
Mother’s milk is often not available in sufficient amounts for preterm infants, so the diet is supplemented by either donor human milk or infant formula. No precise feeding guidelines exists yet on the use of diet supplements for preterm infants. Preterm piglets were fed with total parental nutrition or slowly advancing volumes of infant formula or bovine colostrum as supplementary nutrition. The results showed that feeding infant formula induced intestinal dysfunction whereas bovine colostrum supported gut maturation. Using preterm pigs as animal model for preterm infants, this study provides important information about future feeding guidelines for diet supplements to preterm infants, such as infant formula and bovine colostrum.

Effect of bovine colostrum feeding in comparison with milk replacer and natural feeding on the immune responses and colonization of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the intestinal tissue of piglets
Preterm infants is best nourished with mother’s milk, but it is often insufficient and food supplies as donor human milk or infant formula is added to the diet. Calves are utterly dependent on the cow’s milk as it a vital contribution to their immune system and gastrointestinal system. Preterm piglets were fed with bovine colostrum, milk replacer or maternal milk from the sow to test the effect of diet on the intestinal immune system and presence of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in the intestinal tissue. Piglets fed on sow’s milk and bovine colostrum showed the same reduced colonization by E. coli in the intestinal tissue and a modulated intestinal immune system relative to piglets fed on milk replacer. The frequency of diarrhea was higher in piglets fed with milk replacer and they showed a lower IgG concentration. Using preterm pigs as a model for preterm infants, this study points to the feasibility of bovine colostrum as diet supplement for preterm infants.

Physical activity level is impaired and diet dependent in preterm newborn pigs
Preterm infants show delayed development of motor function after birth, which may relate to functional immaturity of the gut and brain. Early feeding may stimulate gut growth and neonatal physical activity. Calves are dependent on the colostrum provided by the cow to develop a functional gut system. In this study, preterm pigs were fed enteral on sow’s milk only or bovine colostrum, infant formula, or human milk as diet supplement to sow’s milk or as total diet component. The best results came from feeding sow’s milk, bovine colostrum or human milk, the latter two also increasing necrotizing enteritis resistance, relative to formula. The effects may come from maturation of digestive, metabolic and neurological functions by the first enteral feeding. The results points to the feasibility of bovine colostrum as diet supplement to preterm infants, when mother’s milk is in limited supply.


2014

Clinical applications of bovine colostrum therapy: a systematic review
Bovine colostrum is the first milk that cows produce after parturition and contains high levels of growth factors and immunomodulatory components that are crucial for the final development of gut system and immune system in calves. Healthy and diseased individuals may benefit from consuming bovine colostrum as food supplements it may provide gastrointestinal and immunological benefits. Further studies are required before recommendations can be made for clinical application. Based on fifty-one studies this review gives a systematic and critical evaluation of the current state of knowledge on bovine colostrum and usage as diet supplement.

Amniotic fluid and colostrum as potential diets in the critical care of preterm infants
Mother’s milk is the optimal diet for preterm infants, but is often in limited supply. Donor human milk or infant formula is often used as diet supply. Bovine colostrum is rich in immunoglobulins and bioactive proteins and may thus be beneficial as diet supplement for preterm infants and improve gut functions.
Preterm pigs were fed sow’s milk or bovine colostrum in small advancing doses for 5 days. Preterm pigs fed bovine colostrum showed higher body weight gain, while incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis and diarrhea and gut development did not differ between groups. Using preterm pigs as model for preterm infants, bovine colostrum is feasible as diet supplement when mother’s milk is in limited supply.

Bovine colostrum improves intestinal function following formula-induced gut inflammation in preterm pigs
The optimal diet for preterm infants is mother’s milk, but as it is insufficient, diet supplies are necessary. Such are infant formula and donor human milk, but infant formula may induce inflammatory responses and predispose to necrotizing enterocolitis. Calves depend on the colostrum produced by the cow to develop a functioning gastrointestinal system. Preterm pigs were fed with infant formula, bovine colostrum or infant formula followed by bovine colostrum. Preterm pigs fed on colostrum only or after infant formula showed lower necrotizing enterocolitis severity and higher gut growth relative to preterm pigs fed only on infant formula. Thus, bovine colostrum restored the intestinal functions after the initial formula-induced inflammation. Using preterm pigs as model for preterm infants, the results point to the feasibility of bovine colostrum as diet supply when mother’s milk is limited.

Raw bovine milk improves gut responses to feeding relative to infant formula in preterm piglets
The quality of the first milk is crucial for the intestinal maturation and resistance to necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm neonates. Bovine colostrum is rich in immunoglobulins and bioactive proteins and is crucial for the development of the gastrointestinal system and the immune system in calves. Preterm pigs were fed with sow’s milk supplemented with bovine milk, bovine colostrum, infant formula or whole milk powder. Preterm pigs fed bovine milk had significantly improved intestinal structure and function, and suffered less necrotizing enterocolitis than the other pigs. In preterm pigs fed bovine colostrum the results further improved. All three products of intact bovine milk (milk, colostrum and milk powder) showed better effects than infant formula. Using preterm pigs as model for preterm infants, the results point to the feasibility of bovine colostrum as diet supply when mother’s milk is limited.


Andet

Dansk forskningscenter vil styrke præmature børn med optimeret ernæring
Livsbladet (2016), 15(2), 10-16


Biofiber Damino A/S develops and produces animal and human health products. Biodane Pharma A/S and Biofiber Damino A/S both belong to the BIODAN GROUP. Research cooperations are linked to Biodane Pharma A/S through Biofiber Damino A/S and BIODAN GROUP.
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